I mentioned this song

I spoke at Mass in Kilmovee yesterday about Glen Campbell, his living with Azheimers and about his daughter’s song “Remembering”.  It was in the context of the Gospel Passage about the “Rich man and Lazarus” and the need to be aware of one another, especially when people are at a low ebb.

Thought I’d share the video here.  It’s a lovely song and a fine commitment to one who is ill.  We need to notice and help one another.

Four years old running up the stairs to your bed
Thunder rolls and I pull the covers over my head
You say it’s just a storm, enjoy the show
You take me to the window, show me that it’s beautiful
Never had to ask you to sing for me, it’s just the way to put me at ease

Bone for bone we are the same
Bones get tired and they can’t carry all the weight
We can talk until you can’t even remember my name
Daddy don’t you worry, I’ll do the remembering

First guitar and I just wasn’t getting it right
You showed me how to play it, said it doesn’t happen overnight
In a couple years I come home and show you how I play “Blackbird”
Though I miss a couple notes you still say it was the best you ever heard

Never had to ask you to smile for me, it’s just the way you put me at ease
Bone for bone we are the same
Bones get tired and they can’t carry all the weight
We can talk until you can’t even remember my name
Daddy don’t you worry, I’ll do the remembering
Daddy don’t you worry, I’ll do the remembering

Now I have to ask you to sing for me
And I have to show you the worlds to see
You’re standing right in front of me and slipping away

Dad, I’d ask you to smile for me, it’s just the way you put me at ease
Bone for bone we are the same
Bones get tired and they can’t carry all the weight
We can talk until you can’t even remember my name
Daddy don’t you worry, I’ll do the remembering
Daddy don’t you worry, I’ll do the remembering

Written by Ashley Campbell, Kai Jaron Welch • Copyright © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, Nettles And Bones Music

2 thoughts on “I mentioned this song”

  1. Greetings again from the Philippines. I didn’t know this about Glen Campbell. I have a friend from Rathlin Island who lives in the English Midlands, Mrs Frances Molloy, who started a ministry to persons with dementia and to their carers, known as The Pastoral Care Project [http://www.pastoralcareproject.org.uk/ ]. It’s located in the Archdiocese of Birmingham but is ecumenical. You’re probably familiar with the song ‘The Dutchman’. There are a number of videos of the late Liam Clancy singing it. It has a beautiful line similar to ‘Daddy, don’t worry, I’ll do the remembering’ in Ashley Campbell’, song: ;And dear Margaret remembers that for me.’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=429PaSejZCE

    1. Seán, greeting to the Philippines and all Missionary men and women on this Mission Sunday. Thanks for comment. I hadn’t thought of the Dutchman song in that way but it makes perfect sense. Love Liam Clancy’s singing (may he rest in peace). Will have a look at the website you mention. Thanks again for opening up a new thought for me – any maybe for someone else who reads these lines today!

      THE DUTCHMAN (LYRICS)

      http://www.allthelyrics.com/lyrics/tommy_makem/the_dutchman-lyrics-1130918.html#ixzz4Nu67Mdji

      The dutchman’s not the kind of man
      To keep his thumb jammed in the dam that holds his dreams in
      But that’s a secret only Margaret knows
      When Amsterdam is golden
      In the morning Margaret brings him breakfast, she believes him
      He thinks the tulips bloom beneath the snow
      He’s mad as he can be, but Margaret only sees that sometimes
      Sometimes she sees her unborn children in his eyes

      Chorus:
      Let us go to the banks of the ocean
      Where the walls rise above the Zider Zee
      Long ago, I used to be a young man
      And dear Margaret remembers that for me

      The dutchman still wears wooden shoes
      His cap and coat are patched with love that Margaret sewed in
      Sometimes he thinks he’s still in Rotterdam
      He watches tugboats down canals
      And calls out to them when he thinks he knows the captain
      ‘Till Margaret comes to take him home again
      Through unforgiving streets that trip him though she holds his arm
      Sometimes he thinks that he’s alone and calls her name

      The windmills swirl the winter in
      As she winds his muffler tighter, they sit in the kitchen
      And the tea with whiskey keeps away the dew
      He sees her for a moment
      Calls her name, she makes his bed up, humming some old love song
      She learned it when the tune was very new
      He hums a line or two, they hum together in the night
      The dutchman falls asleep and Margaret blows the candle out

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